Everest Weather Reports for Fall 2006



With their sights set on the highest summit in the world, the Berg Adventures’ Everest Expedition 2006 team will be breaking new ground and setting new standards in mountain climbing this fall.

Lead by four-time Everest summitter Wally Berg, and seven-time summiter Dave Hahn, this is an exceptionally strong team that is garnering much attention. The team will have the opportunity to approach climbing Everest is a simple, unfettered style, one team with all the equipment and support they need.

Leadership, respect for one another, respect for the mountain and love for the Sherpa people and their traditions and culture living at the base of the Mother Goddess Chomolonga, or Mt. Everest ,will define our efforts this fall.

Photos courtesy of www.bergadventures.com

Daily weather reports for the Mount Everest region by Michael Fagin - Weather Services www.everestweather.com

10/20/06 - Maximum winds 34 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -29 F (-34 C) and cloudy with some snow showers

10/19/06 - Maximum winds 30 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -29 F (-34 C) with some high clouds

10/18/06 - Maximum winds 32 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -29 F (-34 C) with some high clouds

10/17/06 - Maximum winds 30 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -29 F (-34 C) with some high clouds

10/16/06 - Maximum winds 30 to 50 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -29 F (-34 C) under mostly clear conditions

10/15/06 - Maximum winds 50 to 60 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -29 F (-34 C) under some clouds

10/14/06 - Maximum winds 50 to 60 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -25 F (-32 C) under some clouds

10/13/06 - Maximum winds 50 to 60 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -25 F (-32 C) under mostly clear skies in the late afternoon

10/12/06 - Maximum winds 35 to 45 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -18 F (-28 C) under mostly clear skies in the late afternoon

10/11/06 - Maximum winds 40 to 50 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -18 F (-28 C) under mostly clear skies in the late afternoon

10/10/06 - Maximum winds 35 to 45 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -18 F (-28 C) under mostly clear skies in the late afternoon

10/09/06 - Maximum winds 30 to 40 mph from the west to northhwest with summit temperatures of -18 F (-28 C) under mostly clear skies in the late afternoon

10/08/06 - Maximum winds 35 to 45 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -22 F (-30 C) with a few high clouds

10/07/06 - Maximum winds 40 to 50 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -18 F (-28 C) with a few high clouds

10/06/06 - Maximum winds 50 to 60 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -18 F (-28 C) with a few high clouds

Mount Everest, at 8,850m (29,035ft) above sea level, reigns as the highest mountain on Earth.

The team ascending to the south summit at dawn

October 20, 2006 – Post-Summit Dispatch by Rob DesLauriers
I lie awake at 11pm in my sleeping bag freezing and nervous. I knew it was time to start getting ready. We had moved to the South Col in the afternoon, trying to eat and drink as much as we could, not an easy task at 26,000ft. The winds had died down and it seemed that the weather window we had been praying for was opening for us. I began my preparations. Getting everything together for a summit bid on Everest requires tedious amounts of time and effort.
Eventually, we departed for our summit bid at 1:45am. At 3:30am, Dave Hahn stopped us all and pointed to the east.  We stopped to watch in awe as the moon rose from below us over Tibet. It was a beautiful orange crescent smile.  A light wind from the west forced Kit to put her goggles on in the dark to keep her eyeballs from freezing… it was bone chilling cold.  The glow of morning sun caught up with us at the “Balcony” at 27,500ft which we reached at 5:15am. 
Three hours later we arrived at the South Summit where we waited an hour and a half as we watched Pasang Sherpa lead through steep loose snow on the Hillary step to the final summit ridge.  It was an amazing display of difficult and dangerous route fixing at almost 29,000ft.  The winds were picking up and a banner plume flowed off the summit to the north. Eventually, the rest of the team crossed the knife edge ridge and moved through the Hillary step. The entire 14 person team shared the summit by 11:00am with spectacular views.  It was a beautiful moment for all of us.

Kit and the team approach the Hillary Step on Dave's Rope

As many people say, the summit is only half way. Now the real challenge began… getting down from the summit of Mount Everest safely. On the summit, Kit, Jimmy and I stepped into our ski bindings. It was a dream come true for all of us as we carved our first turns off the summit. We were all excited for Kit, as we all knew she now held the honor of being the first person to have skied from the summit of each of the “Seven Summits
Our intention of a complete ski descent of Everest meant that we were hoping to ski the Hillary Step. Unfortunately, the Hillary Step was not in condition to be skied with a lot less snow than we expected. We decided to rappel the Step with skis on. The plan was for me to go first so I could film Kit from below.  Dave gave me a back up belay, as I began the descent of the Hillary Step. My oxygen ran out half way down the Step, at the crux of the rappel. My world began closing in. The team above was unaware of the situation. Fortunately, Sherpa Mingma Ongell stepped over Kit (with her permission!) and came around the corner to help me finish the descent down the Step.

Rob and Kit DesLauriers on the summit of Everest

At this point, Kit checked her own oxygen supply, saw it about on zero, turned the flow down and decided to get down to the cache of fresh oxygen bottles at the South Summit. She wanted to keep the train moving, which meant changing out from skis to crampons at the uphill corner on the Hillary Step while letting Sherpas step around her.  Jimmy negotiated the Step with his skis on, but also ran out of O’s mid way through the final rappel. He eventually worked his way to the South Summit after getting resupplied with O’s from Kami Sherpa.  In this manner the entire team – after two hours of effort - kept climbing toward the South Summit as the weather closed in.
The time was getting late as it began to snow. The weather was clearly changing. The margin between life and death is thin at 29,000ft. Dave, our guide who has climbed Everest 8 times, had been diligent about hammering this point into us throughout the trip. We all knew we were riding the line. The weather change, the time, issues with oxygen and a potential wind loaded slab below the South Summit pointed to one decision, the complete ski descent was shelved in favor of safety.
I was proud that every climbing member and each climbing Sherpa made every possible correct decision. The hearts of the whole team were as one in the effort to make sure that everyone got down safely.  A post-monsoon season can go by without a summit window on Mount Everest, and I knew we had already threaded the needle and we had gotten to ski off the summit. I also knew that the most technical and serious skiing was still ahead on the Lhotse Face. But at that point, we needed to get back to the South Col.
We all eventually made it back to the South Col and the shelter of our tents at 5:00pm. Exhausted and humbled, I crawled in and crashed.
Once again it is with deep respect that we express our gratitude for the incredible hard work of the first class Sherpa team we have had during this expedition.  During the descent nearly each member was lucky enough to climb down at different times with the companionship of the Sherpas that we had befriended over the last 6 weeks. We all have a special story and memory of their strength and selflessness during that day. It is obvious on the superficial level that they climb Mount Everest, and other mountains in the Himalaya, for a living.  Yet, on the human side they climb for the same love of life, sense of accomplishment and mountaineering camaraderie that we westerners experience.

Congratulations Berg Adventures 2006 Everest Team, YOU DID IT!

This morning I began to work very early on the radio to communicate with Camp IV.  After yesterday’s remarkable success with 14 of our team members standing on the summit together, I knew that the Sherpas and climbing team members would need an early start from the Col today.

FULL DISPATCH ON NEXT PAGE

Weather Map courtesy of http://wxmaps.org
The map above is the 200 millibar chart (which is at about 39,000 feet-11,818 meters) and this is generally where the jet stream can be found.The wind speeds are colored coded. The lightest color have winds of 40 knots(20 meters per second) and the darkest colors have winds of 200 knots (100meters per second)

Winds in jet stream usually exceed 80 knots (40 meters per second)Mount Everest is located in the northeast corner of Nepal.

 


Congratulations Berg Adventures 2006 Everest Team, YOU DID IT!

This morning I began to work very early on the radio to communicate with Camp IV.  After yesterday’s remarkable success with 14 of our team members standing on the summit together, I knew that the Sherpas and climbing team members would need an early start from the Col today.  That is not an easy thing to do – everything is frozen, it is windy and blustery, and your muscles and your nerves are worn from the night and a long day above 8000 meters. 
Even though you need more than anything else in the world to go down it is hard to get moving.
But this team did get moving in a big way….
 
Of course much of my excitement was about Kit, Jimmy and Rob skiing the Lhotse Face.  Would they be able to do it?  I could only wonder if they would be able to get warm enough.  As Jimmy told me after it was all done, “that was some ‘Breakfast of Champions” to start turning down 5000 feet of bullet proof ice first thing in the morning”  I heard Ang Pemba report at about 9:45AM that he saw them enter the South Pillar side of the massive Lhotse Face, behind the Geneva Spur.  At 10:42AM, he reported that they had skied over the bergshrund to the safety of the Western Cwm.  I was relieved and a few minutes later Jimmy called me on the radio, “we all agreed that was the hardest skiing we’d ever done!”  I knew that after yesterday’s climb and descent, and a start like that to their day; I would see this team before the day was over here at Base.
Meanwhile Dave, Bryce, and Mingma Ongel started down the fixed lines toward Camp III and on down to Camp II.  The rest of those remarkable Sherpas on our team began to pack up Camp IV.  Amazingly they cleared all the South Col, and packed up Camp III on the way down to boot.
After that tremendous carry, all the Sherpas are resting at Camp II tonight.  Bryce is with them and reports that he looks forward a good night’s sleep and an early start back to Base tomorrow. 
 
Dave caught his skiing team in the Icefall on the way down and I met them all out by the chorten just as the sun went down.  We popped open some champagne to celebrate a remarkable expedition, one team, one mountain, Sherpas, Canadians, Americans, mountaineers, dreamers, and doers.  This group reached high, learned about the thin margin between success and disaster above 8000 meters, made the right call in every case, and they were blessed by the mountain gods.  Cause for celebration tonight.
We’ve begun to look at some of the images from these past two days on the monitor of Jimmy’s camera. Tomorrow we will send a few out just to give you a taste of the amazing days just past for this team.

October 17, 2006 (Oct. 18, 10:54AM Nepal Time) – Together on the Summit - Dave Hahn's strong, calm voice just came over the radio.  
There was no missing the emotion in it however.  We are all here, he said.  I knew at that time that all 14 climbers of our team were standing on the summit of Everest together.
Dave, Kit, Rob, Jimmy, Kami, Lakpa Galje, and climbing leader Dasona joined the 7 members of the team already on top.
Dave said, "My God, my God this is beautiful".  He spoke, as his voice cracked, of the amazing work this Sherpa team had done this morning and throughout the expedition.  I responded with pride that I knew what he meant, our combination of the old school and the new generation of the finest Sherpa climbers are the reason this team knows the success we have. And Dave Hahn, the man who perhaps more than any other has been "thanked" by others for success on Everest, just kept saying over and over into the radio, "Thank you, Thank you.."
Congratulations on Number Eight, Dave!  And thank you for demonstrating the strength and humility that all the greatest mountaineers have. Now, we are hearing excitedly from some of the Sherpas, "Kit is putting on her skis".  Here we go. this is history folks.

—Wally Berg


Daily weather reports for the Mount Everest region by Michael Fagin - Weather Services www.everestweather.com

10/05/06 - Maximum winds 40 to 50 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -12 F (-25 C) under mostly clear skies in the late afternoon

10/04/06 - Maximum winds 50 to 60 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -18 F (-28 C) under mostly clear skies in the late afternoon

10/03/06 - Maximum winds 50 to 60 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -12 F (-25 C) under mostly clear skies in the late afternoon

10/02/06 - Maximum winds 20 to 26 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -12 F (-25 C) under mostly clear skies in the late afternoon

10/01/06 - Maximum winds 20 to 30 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -12 F (-25 C) under mostly clear skies in the late afternoon

9/30/06 - Maximum winds 26 to 36 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -12 F (-25 C) under mostly cloudy conditions with some light showers

9/29/06 - Maximum winds 30 to 40 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -12 F (-25 C) under mostly clear skies in the late afternoon

9/28/06 - Maximum winds 30 to 40 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -12 F (-25 C) under mostly clear skies in the late afternoon

9/27/06 - Maximum winds 40 to 50 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -12 F (-25 C) under mostly clear skies in the late afternoon

9/26/06 - Maximum winds 30 to 40 mph from the southeast with summit temperatures of -12 F (-25 C) under mostly clear skies in the late afternoon

9/25/06 - Maximum winds 30 from the southeast with summit temperatures of -11 F (-24 C) under mostly cloudy conditions with periods of light snowfall during the evening

9/24/06 - Maximum winds 30 to 40 mph from the southeast with summit temperatures of -11 F (-24 C) under mostly cloudy conditions with periods of moderate to heavy snowfall

9/23/06 - Maximum winds 30 to 40 mph from the southeast with summit temperatures of -11 F (-24 C) under mostly cloudy conditions with periods of moderate to heavy snowfall

9/28/06 - Maximum winds 30 to 40 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -12 F (-25 C) under mostly clear skies in the late afternoon

9/27/06 - Maximum winds 40 to 50 mph from the west to southwest with summit temperatures of -12 F (-25 C) under mostly clear skies in the late afternoon

9/26/06 - Maximum winds 30 to 40 mph from the southeast with summit temperatures of -12 F (-25 C) under mostly clear skies in the late afternoon

9/25/06 - Maximum winds 30 from the southeast with summit temperatures of -11 F (-24 C) under mostly cloudy conditions with periods of light snowfall during the evening

9/24/06 - Maximum winds 30 to 40 mph from the southeast with summit temperatures of -11 F (-24 C) under mostly cloudy conditions with periods of moderate to heavy snowfall

9/23/06 - Maximum winds 30 to 40 mph from the southeast with summit temperatures of -11 F (-24 C) under mostly cloudy conditions with periods of moderate to heavy snowfall

9/22/06 - Maximum winds 30 to 40 mph from the southeast with summit temperatures of -11 F (-24 C) under mostly cloudy conditionswith periods of moderate to heavy snowfall

9/21/06 - Maximum winds 30 to 40 mph from the southeast with summit temperatures of -11 F (-24 C) under mostly cloudy conditions with periods of moderate snowfall

9/20/06 - Maximum winds to 40 mph (with stronger gusts) from the east with summit temperatures of -11 F (-24 C) under mostly cloudy conditions with periods of moderate snowfall

9/19/06 - Maximum winds to 20 mph from the east with summit temperatures of -11 F (-24 C) under mostly cloudy conditions

9/18/06 - Maximum winds at 5 to 12 mph from the east with summit temperatures of -11 F (-24 C) under mostly cloud conditions with snow showers

9/17/06 - Maximum winds at 5 to 12 mph from the north to northeast with summit temperatures of -7.5 F (-22 C) under mostly clear conditions in the evening

9/16/06 - Maximum winds at 20 to 30 mph from the west with summit temperatures of -9 F (-23 C) under mostly clear conditions in the evening

9/15/06 - Maximum winds at 25 to 30 mph from the southwest with summit temperatures of -14 F (-25 C) under partly cloudy conditions

9/14/06 - Maximum winds at 20 to 30 mph from the west with summit temperatures of -14 F (-24 C) under partly cloudy conditions

9/13/06 - Winds at 30 mph from the west with summit temperatures of -14 F (-24 C) under partly cloudy conditions

9/12/06 - Winds at 20 mph from the west with a -6  F (-21 C)  cloudy and some snow showers

9/11/06 - 30 mph from the west and  -25 C ( -13 F)

Mount Everest, at 8,850m (29,035ft) above sea level, reigns as the highest mountain on Earth.

Weather Map courtesy of http://wxmaps.org
The map above is the 200 millibar chart (which is at about 39,000 feet-11,818 meters) and this is generally where the jet stream can be found.The wind speeds are colored coded. The lightest color have winds of 40 knots(20 meters per second) and the darkest colors have winds of 200 knots (100meters per second)

Winds in jet stream usually exceed 80 knots (40 meters per second)Mount Everest is located in the northeast corner of Nepal.

 



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