climber

  • HPClimbologyFilms

    Doctor of Climbology: 9 Must-Watch Climbing Films

    Doctor of Climbology is your shortcut to becoming cultured in climbing. An imperfect, unscientific guide to 55 must-read, must-see, must-hear climbing stories from masters of the art. From must-see DVD's, to Hollywood heroes, to movies so bad they're good, here are 9 climbing films every climber should watch.

  • ClimbologyDigitalHP

    Doctor of Climbology: 13 Must-Follow Climbing Websites, Blogs, and Podcasts

    Doctor of Climbology is your shortcut to becoming cultured in climbing. An imperfect, unscientific guide to 55 must-read, must-see, must-hear climbing stories from masters of the art. Here are 13 sources for digital climbing media interesting, funny, or outrageous enough to keep us clicking back.

  • Doctor of Climbology: 55 Must-Read, Must-See, and Must-Hear Climbing Stories

    Doctor of Climbology: 55 Must-Read, Must-See, and Must-Hear Climbing Stories

    Doctor of Climbology is your shortcut to becoming cultured in climbing. An imperfect, unscientific guide to 55 must-read, must-see, must-hear climbing stories from masters of the art.

  • HPClimbology660

    Doctor of Climbology: 33 Must-Read Climbing Books

    Doctor of Climbology is your shortcut to becoming cultured in climbing. An imperfect, unscientific guide to 55 must-read, must-see, must-hear climbing stories from masters of the art. If you’re new to climbing literature, start with these 33 definitive tales of adventure.

  • HPHero2

    Everyday Hero: 5 Ordinary Climbers Who Saved a Life (Part 2)

    The “brotherhood of the rope” is the unspoken bond between climbing partners who trust each other with their lives. But what happens when the best way to aid your stricken partner is to leave him behind?

  • HPHero2

    Everyday Hero: 5 Ordinary Climbers Who Saved a Life (Part 2)

    The “brotherhood of the rope” is the unspoken bond between climbing partners who trust each other with their lives. But what happens when the best way to aid your stricken partner is to leave him behind?

  • HeroSplashHP

    Everyday Hero: 5 Ordinary Climbers Who Saved a Life

    Because of experience and training, innate ability and fortitude, or just instinctive reactions in moments of crisis, average climbers can respond to deadly emergencies in extraordinary ways. With courage, calm, stamina, strength, and ingenuity, on a day when nobody expected anything but the simple pleasures of climbing, they end up saving a life.

  • On his sixth expedition to China (2013), Libecki leads the third pitch of a big wall first ascent in the Western Kokshaal-Too, Tien Shan Mountains, while Ethan Pringle belays. Photo by Keith Ladzinski.

    Expaddiction

    Sixty feet up a shattered wall of basalt in the Arctic, I just hoped to find a place to set up my portaledge, out of the reach of polar bears. The rock—for lack of a better term—was shitty. But I was still headed up. A couple of soccer ball–size rocks crashed onto the talus to my left, exploding like small bombs. As I hammered in a knifeblade piton, a huge flake shattered like a plate of glass. The fragments sounded like ceramic tiles as they hit the talus below. I needed to find a way up this wall, but this line was death.

  • Golden Piton Awards 2013

    From the first 5.14d onsight to runout 5.13 traditional routes to a multitude of V-hard bouldering flashes, Climbing pays tribute to the most inspirational climbers, ascents, and routes of 2013 with the 12th annual Golden Piton Awards.

  • 50 Years Later with Jim Whittaker and Tom Hornbein

    Jim, you told Gombu to go first to the summit, but he wouldn’t, and you summited together. "There was a great debate about who got to the summit first with Hillary and Tenzing, and I felt it clouded the fact they had both climbed the mountain. So we walked side by side and reached the summit together."

  • Cast of Characters

    Twenty-one climbers and scientists took part in the 1963 Everest expedition. Here are the major players mentioned in our sneak peek of The Vast Unknown.

  • Charley-Mace-West-Shoulder-Headwall-Mt-Everest

    Into the Vast Unknown

    On May 1, 1963 (at least in a small way), when Jim Whittaker of Seattle and Nawang Gombu of Darjeeling, India, became the seventh and eighth people to stand on Everest’s summit. Three weeks later, Lute Jerstad and Barry Bishop followed them, also summiting via the Southeast Ridge. Three hours after that, Tom Hornbein and Willi Unsoeld traversed Everest’s summit, having made the first ascent of the West Ridge.

  • David-Lama-Cerro-Torre-Feat

    2012 Golden Piton Awards: The Year in Climbing

    With Climbing magazine's 11th annual Golden Piton Awards, we celebrate the biggest, hardest, fastest, and scariest ascents of 2012. Prepare to be inspired. Winners include The American Alpine Club, Cameron Hörst, Brooke Raboutou, Ashima Shiraishi, Alex Honnold, Kyle Dempster, Hayden Kennedy, Sean McColl, Adam Ondra, Tomoko Ogawa, and the Red River Gorge, Kentucky.

  • Vet-Ex-Featured-660

    Invisible Wounds

    Hours before sunup, we click on our headlamps and follow the blue-hued cones of light on the first steps of what will surely be a very long day. We’re embarking on a 20-mile traverse of the Mummy Range in Rocky Mountain National Park, over the course of which we’ll summit seven peaks over 13,000 feet. For the first half hour or so, our crew of eight military veterans doesn’t say a word—the only sounds are gravelly footfalls and varied degrees of labored breathing in the thin alpine air.

  • Prominent Norwegian Alpinists Die in Accident

    Prominent Norwegian climbers Bjorn-Eivind Artun, 45, and Stein-Ivar Gravdal, 37, died while attempting a new ice route on the big wall of Kjerag, Lyesbotn, in southwest Norway.

  • Alaskan Alpine Club Founder Dies

    Doug Buchanan was filled with hospitality, humor, wit, intelligence, incredible drive, insight, and honor. His last adventure was a fight with cancer.

  • The view from Gasherbrum II. Photo by Cory Richards

    2012 Golden Piton Awards

    On frozen Karakoram peaks, fierce alpine faces, and crags around the world, climbers killed it last year. Here, Climbing presents the 10th annual Golden Piton Awards for top performances in six disciplines: mountaineering, big wall, traditional climbing, crack climbing, sport climbing, and breakaway success.

  • Survivors - Enduring Desperate Situations

    Survivors - Enduring Desperate Situations

    We surveyed readers and more than a dozen climbing historians and writers in North America and Europe to collect 25 stories of stamina, ingenuity, and human will, some well-known, others not. Our hope is to remind readers to take care and prevent accidents--to"do nothing in haste, look well to each step," as Whymper famously said after the Matterhorn tragedy.

  • Staying Alive

    Staying Alive

    Survival tips from climbing rangers - Nobody expects to be loaded onto a litter and evacuated off his first big wall. Or stuck in a snow cave, out of food and fuel, hypothermic, and praying that a storm will quit and someone will find him. Yet it happens, every year, and not just to newbies. Climbers make mistakes, or get unlucky, and rescue rangers drop from the sky and save our asses.

  • 10 Things You Didn't Know about Avalanches

    10 Things You Didn't Know about Avalanches

    Avalanche danger will always be a hazard for those seeking to climb some of the world's most sought-after peaks. Here's a look at some facts about the deadly snow slides.

  • Everest Pioneer Nawang Gombu Dies at 79

    Everest Pioneer Nawang Gombu Dies at 79

    4/25/11 - Nawang Gombu Sherpa, who accompanied Jim Whittaker to the summit during the first American ascent of Mt. Everest, in 1963, died at home in India on April 24.

  • 2010 Golden Piton Awards

    2010 Golden Piton Awards

    Hardest, highest, fastest, best--it's human nature to submit our "ests" to the test. Is it an ego thing? A crude exercise in nationalism? A magazine scam for commercial interests? You could play it that way. But how boring. And futile. In the end, we appraise others' achievements and compare them to our own weekend-warrior world for one reason: to be inspired.

  • Wing and a Prayer

    Wing and a Prayer

    The Curious Case of Maurice Wilson and his Doomed Quest for Mt. Everest .

  • Angels of Mont Blanc

    Angels of Mont Blanc

    Inside the world's busiest alpine-rescue service - Francis Claudon, of the Peloton de Gendarmerie de Haute Montagne (PGHM) in Chamonix, France, was on second call that July evening. With one team already out on a rescue, he was kitted up and ready for the next mission, boots on and rucksack packed.

  • Chloe Graftiaux Dies in the Alps

    Chloe Graftiaux Dies in the Alps

    8/23/10 - On Saturday, August 21, Belgian climber Chloe Graftiaux died after falling from the South Face of Aiguille Noire de Peuterey in the Mont Blanc.

  • Erik Weihenmayer Interview: Alpamayo Ascent

    Erik Weihenmayer Interview: Alpamayo Ascent

    When he was 13, just heading into his freshman year of high school, Erik Weihenmayer lost his eyesight, impeding his ability to play baseball, soccer, and basketball--some of the things that define boys in their teenage years.

  • HP10thingsgranite

    10 Things You Didn't Know About Granite

    Granite. Climbers love it, even as it tears their flesh, steals their gear, and makes them feel oh-so-small. You know how granite feels under your hands and feet, how it smells, and the way it turns to gold in the last light of day, but here are a few things you probably didn't know.

  • Guy Lacelle Killed in Avalanche

    Guy Lacelle Killed in Avalanche

    Canadian ice climber Guy Lacelle died in an avalanche in Hyalite Canyon, Montana, while climbing a snow gully between climbs.

  • 2009 Golden Piton Awards

    2009 Golden Piton Awards

    2009 has been a year of hardship and strife. It would be foolish to ignore the fact that the "recession" (OK, full-blown depression) continues. Still, climbers will climb, and it's nice to see that -- at least on the rocks and in the hills -- the movement hasn't been retrograde. In fact, it's been a damn good year for climbing.

  • Open Bivy - METAMORPHOSIS

    Open Bivy - METAMORPHOSIS

    Alaska, 1991: a ptarmigan spoke to me from 90 feet up Middle Triple Peak (8,835 feet), in the Kichatna Range. Seth Shaw and I had just ticked the second ascent of the venerable East Buttress (VI 5.9 A3; 3,300 feet) in grotesque conditions. As we made the last of 20-some raps to the glacier, the Fates dished out more adventure ...

  • AMPED: The climbs back home for three veterans

    AMPED: The climbs back home for three veterans

    Three wounded Iraq War Veterans recount their near-death stories and triumphant climbs back home.

  • Charlie Houston Dies at 96

    Charlie Houston Dies at 96

    Charles Houston, a pioneering American climber and altitude researcher, died at his home in Vermont on September 27. He was 96.

  • Craig Luebben Killed in North Cascades

    Craig Luebben Killed in North Cascades

    Craig Luebben, the well-known Colorado climber, guide, teacher, and author, was killed early Sunday morning when glacial ice collapsed on Mt. Torment in North Cascades National Park.

  • The Guidebook Odyssey - Unearthing the epic task of writing a guidebook

    The Guidebook Odyssey - Unearthing the epic task of writing a guidebook

    Never a fan of guidebooks, I’ve long had a “just pick a route that looks good and climb“ mentality. “It’s supposed to be an adventure!“ I’d tell myself. Until one fateful day at Colorado‘s Eldorado Canyon.

  • 2008 Golden Piton Awards

    2008 Golden Piton Awards

    Climbing magazine presents its annual Golden Piton Awards for the top climbers in bouldering, sport climbing, competition climbing, alpine climbing, and more.

  • Disaster on K2

    Disaster on K2

    8/04/08 - The initial news report on the 2008 K2 disaster. A large number of climbers were dead or missing after an ice avalanche hit the upper mountain during a big summit push on August 1.

  • Climbers Lost Near End of Huge Alaskan Traverse

    Climbers Lost Near End of Huge Alaskan Traverse

    5/30/08 - The National Park Service has called off the active search for Japanese climbers Yuto Inoue, 24, and Tatsuro Yamada, 27, who disappeared high on the Cassin Ridge of Denali this month. The two climbers had been attempting a massive link-up that finishes up the Cassin Ridge.

  • Chris Allport

    Climber Christopher Allport died in an avalanche in the San Gabriel Mountains near Wrightwood, California on January 25th . A multi-sport athlete, as well as a talented actor and musician, Chris had a life-long love of the mountains, rivers, and coasts of California.

  • Dark Side of the Climber Mind

    Dark Side of the Climber Mind

    By Matt Samet, Kenneth Long, Fitz Cahall, Majka Burhardt, and Chad Shepard - We’ve gathered five essays linked by a common thread: dark manifestations of the climber mind because many climbers face these issues, but cowed by the cacophony of the dirtbag-chic, free-wheelin’ climbing community, silence themselves.

  • Bob Bates Passes

    Bob Bates Passes

    9/19/07 - Robert Hicks Bates, a pioneer of American climbing in the Yukon and the Himalaya, died on September 13 at age 96.

  • The Snows of Genyen

    The Snows of Genyen

    Two of America's hardiest alpinists, Charlie Fowler and Christine Boskoff, went missing in the eastern Himalaya last December during a mission to climb untamed peaks. As the days ticked by, friends began to worry: These were not the kind of climbers just to disappear.

  • Lara Kellogg Killed in Alaska

    4/30/07 - Seattle climber Lara-Karena Kellogg, 38, was killed in a rappelling accident while descending Mt. Wake in Alaska’s Ruth Gorge last Monday.

  • Charlie Fowler Passes

    12/31/06 - The search for American alpinists Charlie Fowler and Christine Boskoff in the Yunnan Province of China has ended.

  • Berhault Killed in the Alps

    4/29/04 - Patrick Berhault, one of the most visionary and accomplished climbers of recent decades, died in a fall from the Dom, the highest peak in Switzerland, three-quarters of the way through his unprecedented bid to climb all of the 4,000-meter peaks of the Alps non-stop by foot and ski.

  • Golden Piton Award: Mixed Climbing (2003)

    Golden Piton Award: Mixed Climbing (2003)

    Ines Papert of Germany set a new standard for women’s mixed climbing in 2003 when she repeated Mission Impossible (M11), near Courmayeur, Italy, a route that just two years earlier was thought to be the hardest in the world.

  • 2003 Golden Piton Awards: Lifetime Achievement

    While a list of revered, veteran North American climbers is long, the roll of those who’ve reached true iconic status is short. Near the top of that brief list is Fred Beckey.

  • 2004 Golden Piton Awards: Solo Climbing

    2004 Golden Piton Awards: Solo Climbing

    Steve House climbed in pure alpine style on a nearly 7000-meter peak that had been climbed only once before, in 1984, by a Japanese team that placed thousands of feet of fixed rope and 450 bolts or pins.

  • 2003 Golden Piton Awards: Service

    Peter Metcalf, and the OIA membership that supported him, changed the face of negotiations involving primitive recreation on public lands, showing that leaving wild lands wild is green in more ways than one.

  • Hans Gmoser Dies After Bike Accident

    Hans Gmoser Dies After Bike Accident

    7/7/06 - Legendary Canadian mountaineer Hans Gmoser, 73, died this week after a cycling accident. Gmoser founded Canadian Mountain Holidays, a leading guide service and helicopter skiing operation, in 1957, and he inspired generations of Rockies climbers and skiers.

  • Brad Washburn Dead at 96

    Brad Washburn Dead at 96

    1/11/07 - Bradford Washburn, one of the key figures of American mountaineering in the 20th century, died last night at a retirement home near Boston. He was 96.