Roc'terra Rock Shoe Review

Avatar:
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
0
Roc'terra Rock Shoe Review

Roc’terra Dsungari, $79

Summary: If you’re new to the trad and alpine crack-climbing worlds, check out the Dsungari. This moderately stiff, cambrelle-lined, board-lasted shoe holds up well in wide cracks, though its chiseled toe was too boxy for thin cracks. The Dsungari also edges well, but subsequently loses out on smearability, making it a less-than-ideal candidate for

sport climbing

. One minor flaw is that the heel pull-tabs are sewn onto the interior of the shoe, which can cause chafing.

Pros: Inexpensive. Durable.

Cons: Heel pull-tabs sewn on inside of shoe.

Overall grade: B+

Roc’terra/PMI: (888) 764-1437, www.pmirope.com

Roc'terra Rock Shoe Review

Roc’terra Troodon, $101

Summary: The Troodon sports a solid edging platform and high rubber rands, making it a decent performer on face routes. However, the unlined Troodon falls short on fit, mainly due to its ineffective single Velcro strap and chunky elastic tongue. The strap, which diagonals from the outside of the shoe inward, does little to cinch the forefoot, mainly tightening the arch of the shoe and leaving your toes swimming.

Pros: Plenty of toe rand. Edges well.

Cons: Sloppy forefoot. Heel pull-tabs sewn on inside of shoe.

Overall grade: C-

Roc’terra/PMI: (888) 764-1437, www.pmirope.com

Roc'terra Rock Shoe Review

Roc’terra Tyrrano, $110

Summary: A solid entry in the all-around category, the Tyranno combines a strong yet flexible edging platform with a generous rand. This shoe provides solid sport performance and does reasonably well in cracks, as long as they aren’t too thin. The cambrelle lining will keep stretch to a minimum, so expect these shoes to withstand many resoles.

Pros: Solid all-around performance. Generous randing.

Cons: Lacing doesn’t extend far enough down toe. Heel pull-tabs sewn on inside of shoe.

Overall grade: B+

Roc’terra/PMI: (888) 764-1437, www.pmirope.com