March 2013 - 313


Climbing-Cover-313Destinations

THE GUIDE - TRUE GRIT: Areas like the Red River Gorge and Indian Creek offer more than just pockets and cracks. You should also visit for their pure, unadulterated enduro climbs.

MODERATE MARVELS: You don't have to climb 5.12 to get high off the deck with beautiful scenery behind you; here, the country's best 5.6 routes.

EVOLUTION OF CANYON MAN: Southern climbing doesn't always entail warm locals and a laid-back atmosphere. In Little River Canyon, it's darker and harder—but very worth a trip.

CLIMBERS' REPUBLIC OF CHINA: Four trendsetting Americans visiting Liming in late 2011. What'd they find? Soaring sandstone walls up to 650 feet tall, with huge potential.

FIXED ANCHORS: Fifteen years ago, fixed anchors in Wildnerness became a hot-button issue. This year, government agencies might finally decide their fate.

Health & Training

A DOGGED ATTITUDE: Tired of climbing laps in the gym over and over to up your endurance? Switch it up with these new workouts.

TREAT AN INJURED ANKLE: Accidents happen—and they're harder to manage in the field. Here's how to assess and splint a broken or sprained ankle with minimal gear.

Gear

FOOD FOR THOUGHT: Training isn't the only thing that will boost your endurance. Here, pros and Climbing readers share their favorite foods for long days at the crag.

SACRIFICE NOTHING: You don't have to buy separate pairs of climbing shoes for different rock climbs; here, our favorite new kicks that marry comfort and performance.

TESTED: Climbing editors and testers abuse gear on a daily basis. Here are the items that stood out most in 2012.

Skills

REST FOR SUCCESS: If you like to constantly push your limits, chances are you get pumped. A lot. Here's how to recharge en-route.

LOWER AWAY! Rappelling on a multi-pitch route can result in stuck ropes, especially in windy conditions. Avoid this by lowering instead.

HOW TO GO NUMBER 2: Everybody poops. But your morning constitutional can become tricky when it's outside. Here, the definitive poo protocol.

HOW TO FALL: Falling is a crucial part of learning to climb. Get comfortable with it—on any terrain.

Departments

Editorial

Flash

The Guide

Gear

Routes

Semi-Rad

Clinics


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