2009 Boulder International Film Festival

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For more information visit: www.biff1.com

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Title: Journey to the CenterProgram 34, Sunday Feb. 15, 12:15 pm, Boulder High School USA/China, Feature Documentary, 2008, 54 minWinner of Best Film on Mountain Sports at the 2008 Banff Mountain Film Festival In 1996, American spy satellites discovered a geographical anomaly in the center of China. Analysts began to worry that the Chinese were constructing a nuclear missile silo. A group of agents posing as cavers were sent to investigate. It turned out to be a natural phenomenon–the world’s deepest vertical cave. Its name is Xiao Tiankeng, The Heavenly Pit. Journey with three world-renowned BASE jumpers as they travel 10,000 miles by airplane, river boat and 4x4 truck to confront the mist and mystery of the old cave, an ancient culture and their own demons at the center of their dangerous mission. Millions of years old, a halfmile deep, Tiankeng has waited for eons to test the endurance, skill and courage of the men who dare to parachute into her heart.Directed by Jens Hoffman Colorado Premiere

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Title: Red Goldprogram 34, Sunday Feb. 15, 12:15pm, Boulder High School Colorado/USA, Feature Documentary, 2008, 55 minWinner of the Audience Award at the 2008 Banff Mountain Film Festival This remarkable film shows the potential impact of the construction of the world’s largest open pit mine in the pristine headwaters of the Kvichak and Nushagak Rivers in Bristol Bay, Alaska—the two largest remaining sockeye salmon runs on the planet. Colorado filmmakers Ben Knight and Travis Rummel, in associaton with Trout Unlimited, spent two months in Bristol Bay documenting the tension between native fishermen who oppose the dam and mine officials who say they will build a “clean” mine that will leave the salmon’s habitat untouched. This exquisite story goes beyond the conflict, offering a portrait of a unique way of life that wouldn’t exist if the salmon don’t return.Directed by Ben Knight and Travis Rummel Boulder Premiere Ben Knight and Travis Rummel in person

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Title: The Last Days of Shishmarefprogram 22, Saturday, 10:00am, Boulder High School Netherlands/USA, Feature Documentary, 2008, 95 minOn the Academy Awards short list Scientists have called them the first victims of global warming: the ancient Inupiaq village of Shishmaref is being eaten by the sea. It’s difficult to watch this film without sympathy for the villagers as their homes fall into the ocean and they are met with the task of relocating their entire population of 600 people miles inland. The icy landscape—its water, smoke, steam and sky—is beautifully and quietly photographed, as are the village’s inhabitants. Every frame is a slow, poignant portrait. We feel the loss of the families, too poor to protect themselves from the impending doom, as they realize that they will never recover a way of life now being destroyed by the warming Northern oceans.Directed by Jan Louter Colorado Premiere Followed by a Q&A with Shannon McNeeley, National Science Foundation Fellow, Institute for the Study of Science and Environment, NCAR

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