Climbing Magazine publishes first ever Photo Annual Special

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Climbing Magazine, the most widely read and longest-running magazine in the world covering the vertical scene, is publishing its first ever Photo Annual. The entire issue is devoted to showcasing the best photographers and most outrageous photographs in the sport. In addition to image after image, the Photo Annual brings the reader behind the lens of five top photographers, a digital camera buyer's guide, and announces the winners of the first annual Reader Photo Contest sponsored by Petzl/Charlet-Moser. The Photo Annual goes on sale at specialty stores and selected newsstands on May 22, 2003.

Incredible ascents produce unforgettable images, and the Photo Annual showcases such an ascent with an exclusive first-hand account by Dean Potter of his Half Dome / El Cap free-in-a-day link up last year. Photographer Jimmy Chin takes a visual trip with Potter through that epic day as he tells the behind-the-scenes story of toil and obsession. "Dean pulled off one of the Valley's greatest climbs- getting the inside scoop alongside Jimmy's stunning photos is a rare treat." says Climbing's Senior Editor, Matt Stanley. The Photo Annual sports a dramatically expanded Gallery, which according to, Zach Reynolds, Climbing's Photo Editor, "is a collection of the finest images to cross my light table in the last year."

The Photo Annual takes the reader into the minds and behind the lens of top climbing photographers, Jim Thornburg, Aaron Black, Simon Carter, Cameron Lawson, and Tim Kemple. In special mini-departments, the photographers explain via words and images, their techniques, tools and tricks critical to capturing the defining moments of the sport. Each photographer goes in depth on an aspect at which they are particularly adept or experienced.

Versatility and convenience has many climbers switching to digital cameras to document their outings and share them online. Climbing's digital camera buyer's guide navigates them towards models best suited to operating in the vertical world; with advice on what to look for and why, as well as tips for best results in the field.