Outdoor Retailer Top 10


Petzl Nao headlamp

Last week Salt Lake hosted the annual Outdoor Retailer Winter Market trade show, the place where manufacturers show off their hottest new gear, clothes, skis, and more. This is the gear that will be arriving on retail shelves later this year. Four Climbing and Urban Climber editors roamed the Salt Palace for three days, checking out the wares. Here, our picks for the 10 coolest new products for climbers.

Petzl Nao headlamp. The pioneering headlamp maker introduced its “reactive lighting” technology, in which the beam automatically adjusts from 7 to 355 lumens, depending on the amount of outside light hitting the lamp. Great for battery life and user comfort, but it comes at a price: $175.

Water-resistant down from Brooks Range and Sierra Design. Down offers the best warmth for weight of any insulation, but it collapses and clumps if it gets wet. So, how about if you could keep the down from absorbing water? Parkas and sleeping bags that promise to do just that are coming soon.

Marmot Alpinist Hybrid jacket. A tricked-out, light-and-fast layer with Primaloft insulation in the front, Power Stretch fleece on the back, arms, and shoulders, and a low-volume Lycra hood to wear under a helmet. $250.

Outdoor Research Lodestar jacket

Goal Zero Sherpa 50 portable recharger. Sleeker and lighter (14 oz.), the new Sherpa 50 weighs less than half as much as its predecessor but still provides 50 watt-hours to power up a phone, laptop, or GPS. $250

Grivel X Blade ice tools. A decent ice tool for just $120? At less than half of the cost of many tools, the all-steel X Blade, with interchangeable grips for mixed or ice, might be just the thing for the casual ice climber. $120

Scarpa Tech Ascent boots. A cross between a light hiking boot and an approach shoe, these look like just the ticket for climbs like the Grand Teton, especially for those who want more support than an approach shoe will give you. $219

Outdoor Research Lodestar jacket and pants. This is high-breathing, wicking yet weatherproof softshell for cold, dry climbs. On the torso, it uses a new Polartec fabric called Power Shield High Loft that’s lined with lofty fleece on the inside and has a cool-looking molded pattern on the outside. The hood, shoulders, and sleeves add Power Shield Pro softshell with a laminate for more protection. $450 jacket; $399 pant.

Mammut Alpine Rider helmet. A lightweight, fully adjustable helmet that meets European standards for climbing and skiing. With a removable fleece lining and ear protection for skiing, and at just under $100, it looks like a great value.

Wild Things Insulight jacket. An ultralight puffy with a thin layer of Primaloft insulation, a Nextec Epic shell for big-time water-resistance, and breathable side panels under the arms, this made-in-the-USA jacket looks brilliant for breezy spring and fall rock climbs. Bonus: Wild Things is making this and many other clothes for women now. $189.

CAMP X Draw. A super-light, super-compact load-limiting quickdraw made with Dyneema sling, the X Draw is said to reduce the impact of Factor 1 falls by 50 percent. Will be available with or without Photon carabiners.

 



Comments

Yeah, that's exactly what it felt like: a crap shoot. Fortunately, when I was back at the wall a coplue days later someone had gone through and put the V markings on all the routes, which certainly made finding doable routes much easier!The only big disadvantage to the gym I am a member of is there is a large number of younger children that are there on a regular basis (both the Junior team as well as other kids). As you probably know, middle school and high school climbers don't always have the best etiquette when sharing the wall with others. I think because of this, most of the young adults wait until 8 or 9 PM before heading to the gym, and climb until close at 11. I'm usually there from 6 to 8, so maybe I need to swap my schedule around to give myself the opportunity to meet more climbers my age.

Ben - 10/27/2012 12:22:01

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