Re-Gram: 9 Crag Dogs

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This story originally appeared in the September 2015 issue of our print edition.

Dogs do not make good belayers, but the well-behaved provide other benefits at the cliff. From moral support with endless licks to encouraging tail wags to stress-relieving belly rubs, a good crag dog can be an integral part of your climbing team. Here are some four-legged climber companions submitted by our readers.

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We’re teaching Layla the basics of Grigri use in Golden, Colorado. Obviously, she’s a natural.
—Kris Kemp

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Goldie the crag dog-ess is a good belayer—when she stays awake.
–Phil Broscovak

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My crag dog Teddy is an escape artist, but he wasn’t getting out of this one.
—Cheryl Hackworth

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Layne Potter raps with Bess the Jack Russell after the first ascent of Snakes and Arrows Tower in the Northern San Rafael Swell.
–Paul Ross

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Brown has been my partner since he was 8 weeks old. Best belay a soloist can get.
–Logan Berndt

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Tucker’s version of helping me pack for a weekend of ice climbing in Bancroft, Ontario.
–Adam Gascho

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When other people are around, we anchor Lu and Ellie while we climb.
–Raelyn Vita

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Aiden is used to big-mile days. Here at Deception Crags, he’s giving me a look that says, “When are we going to start hiking?”
–Andrea Jones

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Miss Nelly in search of some classic trad lines down at the Ultimates, Pumphouse Wash, Arizona.
@ad_van_ture_bum