skill

  • Laybacks

    Learn This: Master Laybacks (With Tips From Cheyne Lempe)

  • HPTopouts

    Learn This: Master Topouts

    With most outdoor problems, it isn’t considered finished until you’re standing on top. At that point, you’re often pumped and high off the ground, so it isn’t the ideal time to experiment with the finer points of technique. Learn how to do these maneuvers in a safe and easy environment so you can nail them on harder terrain.

  • FP660

    Beyond The Butt Shot: 7 Pro Tricks To Enhance Your Climbing Photos

    I’ve been shooting climbing for 12 years, and this is my simple advice for avoiding the most basic climbing photography no-no—the dreaded “butt shot.” It’s an easy mistake to make; from the ground, the climber’s backside is basically all you see, but it doesn’t have to be all you show. There are easy ways to wow your friends and produce quality, interesting, and (if I do say so myself) downright awesome photos, all from below. This is one of the most painless places to shoot, one of my personal favorites, and best of all—there’s no rigging required.

  • HPHandCrack

    Learn This: How To Climb Finger Cracks

    Cruising the perfect hand crack is a joyous feeling. But when it narrows to fingers, the real battle begins—even hand-crack wizards might take the ride. The secret to floating up finger fissures is still in the feet, but you’ve got less to work with. Unless your feet are freakishly small, you’ll have to jam just your tippy toes, smear on the edges of the crack, or look for holds on the face. Then there’s the seemingly infinite ways to use your digits. Whether you’re seeking out pods and pin scars in Yosemite or tackling the blissful parallels of Indian Creek, we’ve compiled tricks of the trade that will open up a whole new world of crack climbing.

  • HPBelay

    25+ Ways To Be A Better Belayer

  • HPAutoBlock

    Essential Skills: Auto-Blocking Belay Devices

    This setup, which is also called “guide mode,” automatically stops the rope from moving through the device—or “catches” the follower—if he falls. It’s a must-have tool and technique for anyone who wants to tackle multi-pitch climbs.

  • HPRope

    Learn This: Alpine Rope Management

    Managing the rope at belays and rappels on multi-pitch routes can be a smooth operation that leads to quick transitions and more climbing. Or it can be a headache-inducing rats’ nest of chaos that means wrestling with yourself every time you try to feed out slack. Instead of spending your summer alpine season untangling a rope, learn a few simple methods that will help you spend more time sending. Try out these tricks on shorter routes so that when you’re faced with 15 pitches or 10 long rappels, you’ll have these techniques dialed in and ready to put to use.

  • HPNuts

    Learn This: Nuts 102

    Recognizing subtle constrictions in natural rock takes a trained eye, and maximizing surface contact is an art learned through experience. Nevertheless, here are a few more tricks and tips that will help you up your nut game.

  • HPSlab

    Instant Expert: Friction Slabs (With Tips From Hazel Findlay)

    In an odd way, friction slabs are like wide cracks: Hate ’em all you want, but you can’t climb some of the most classic trad routes without working through them. It’s common to find slab sections leading into and out of perfect cracks in places like Yosemite and Lumpy Ridge, Colorado. They’re characterized by a low angle (between roughly 65° and 80°) and a dearth of holds (think: micro-divots, bumps, edges, dishes, and nubbins ). There’s nothing to pull down on, so you must employ a set of techniques unique to these features (or lack thereof).

  • HPHaul2

    Learn This: Haul Your Partner Through Tough Sections

  • HPPack

    Learn This: Pack Smarter

    When I see that guy on the trail with a tent, banjo, puppy, and pony keg swaying from carabiners, I’m just left wondering why. Why do so many of our otherwise reasonable mountain buddies want so badly to strap their kit to the outside of their sad, under-utilized packs instead of just putting it all inside?

  • HPWeather

    Learn This: How To Read Mountain Weather

    The Southeast Buttress of Cathedral Peak in Tuolumne Meadows. Grand Teton. The Diamond on Colorado’s Longs Peak. Some of the country’s most compelling routes require a trip into the alpine, where the sweat poured into frequently grueling approaches is paid back in spectacular summit views. But it takes more than solid quads, healthy lungs, and good climbing technique to ensure success on an alpine climb; it also takes a healthy respect for mountain weather.