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Olympics

Video: Olympic Sport Climbing Silver Medalist Nathaniel Coleman

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US Olympian Nathaniel Coleman understands the importance of rest. Rest from training, rest from working, and rest from competition. But not competing doesn’t mean lethargic days on the couch. After qualifying for the Olympics, and its subsequent postponement, Coleman threw himself into outdoor bouldering. “It was nice to take some time away from the competition, of the seriousness of the Games,” he said.

Coleman established the hardest boulder of his life, The Grand Illusion (V15/16), and returned to competition climbing with fresh eyes. “Projecting outside made me realize how much your body can adapt over the course of two weeks to a single movement,” he said. “That’s helped me unlock a new level in my training.”

 

Enjoy this profile on Coleman by Cold House Media.

Read More: The Captain: The Rise of Nathaniel Coleman