Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Brands

News

Close But No Cigar on South Paine

Get full access to Outside Learn, our online education hub featuring in-depth fitness, nutrition, and adventure courses and more than 2,000 instructional videos when you sign up for Outside+ Sign up for Outside+ today.


Close But No Cigar on South Paine

Britons Stuart McAleese and Mike “Twid” Turner pioneered a route up the unclimbed 3,500-foot South Face of the South Tower of Paine in Chilean Patagonia, but a five-day storm near the top prevented them from climbing easier terrain to the summit. The two weaved up the big granite wall in 15 long pitches (5.10 A3), climbing capsule-style for 15 cold and stormy days, with portaledge bivouacs. At the top of the wall, easy mountaineering terrain promised a quick route to the top, but the storm pinned them at their bivy and eventually forced a retreat in frightening conditions, with gusts estimated at 125 mph blowing them horizontally off belay anchors; they had to pull themselves hand over hand down some of the rappels. The route was named The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly.

Date of Ascent: November-December 2006

Source: Twid Turner (www.sheersummits.com)

Comment on this story