Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Brands

News

These Kids Used Parachute Cord For Slings …. Said They Learned It From The Boy Scouts

They needed to be prepared for disaster. Fortunately, a real climber stepped in.

Get full access to Outside Learn, our online education hub featuring in-depth fitness, nutrition, and adventure courses and more than 2,000 instructional videos when you sign up for Outside+ Sign up for Outside+ today.

I was at the 9th Street crag in Ogden, Utah. Three high school kids were setting up a toprope on the route next to us, Cub Scout Corner (5.7). I was a little confused when they threw down two ropes from the top, then I saw their anchor. They had wrapped a bunch of paracord between the bolts, clipped one non-locking carabiner to it, and ran both of their ropes through it. They said they learned it from the Boy Scouts. I asked them if I could help, and they let me build a new anchor.
—Tyson Scott

LESSON: Standard paracord, popular among doomsday preppers and survival bracelet manufacturers, has a breaking strength of just 550 pounds. Any knot in any cord will reduce its strength. The crew above is cutting it a bit close. The most popular anchor materials that climbers use are 8mm nylon accessory cord and sewn nylon or Dyneema slings. The accessory cord has a breaking strength of about 15kN, and a sewn sling will be around 20 kN. One kilonewton is roughly equivalent to 225 pounds of force. The accessory cord is over seven times as strong as paracord. We wouldn’t recommend paracord for any climbing application. Only use materials designed and rated for climbing. Don’t run two ropes through one carabiner (unless you’re using twin ropes, which are a specialized tool not commonly used for toproping). And don’t run your toprope through a single non-locker. And take an anchor building class if you are the people mentioned in this story.

Weekend Whipper: Ice Soloist Lets Go of Both Axes and Decks. (He Lives.)

Want more? Check out more installments in our ever-growing hall of shame: 

Lucky He Didn’t Die. Lowered From a Toy Carabiner

Unfortunate Groundfall, Fortunate Landing

Leader Decks When Experienced Climber Bungles the Belay

Saw Through Someone Else’s Rope

Belayed With Hands Only—No Device!

Smoke Brick Weed and Go Climbing

Belay With a Knife In Your Hand

Don’t Let a Clueless Dad Take a Kid Climbing

She Got Frustrated and Untied—On Lead

Learn to Climb Trad: Gear Placements and Anchors